[9] Love Letter

Three under four wasn’t (see: isn’t) always easy. It takes a village, that’s for sure. And this is why I miss my mothers’ group.

For those who may not be so familiar with the (Australian) term, a mothers’ group is a group of first-time mothers and their babies assigned a group by their local council based on their location and the date of baby’s birth. Some groups can be brilliant, others not so much. But my group was one-of-a-kind.

Let me tell you why.

Ladies, this is my love letter to you.

I’m here, with three kids, and I’m missing you, my friends. As you well know, I’m used to an active social life and it goes without saying that my friends are as close to me as family. You were the women living closest to me, and the ones I saw most often. You were the ones who salvaged my sanity when I became a mother.

When I had Clara and was living in Brighton, I was seriously nervous about what my mothers’ group would be like. Brighton, for those who aren’t familiar with it, is an affluent, coastal suburb of Melbourne. It’s very, well, white and mainly populated by old, rich folk, celebrities, and politicians. As a big fan of diversity, I was pretty sure that living in Brighton wouldn’t be my jam. At least so I thought.

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Before I’d even met you, ladies, I’d made up my mind that we’d have nothing at all in common. Minds can be such experts in sabotage! I really felt that I knew what you’d be like: super rich, and never having worked a day in your lives! You’d be decked out in tennis whites and fashionable activewear. You’d be footballer’s wives, and you’d have had all the plastic surgery in the world!

I also fooled myself into thinking I didn’t need new friends. After all – I had plenty of parent and non-parent buddies! How wrong I was. About all of this.

Our group was a mix of amazing, accomplished women from all over the world. Women who had careers. Intelligent, well-read, well-travelled women. Women with a diverse set of talents and interests. But what brought us all together was acceptance of each other and each other’s ways of mothering.

Breast or bottle, it didn’t matter. C-section or vaginal birth, it didn’t matter. Co-sleeping or cot sleeping in another room, it didn’t matter. Sleep training or no sleep training, it didn’t matter. Everyone supported each other’s choices. We still do.

We met many times a week. Mainly in coffee shops, but often for long walks along the beach, a trail of a dozen prams spread out along the Elwood and Brighton foreshore. We arranged weekly pilates classes. We picnicked in the local gardens with blankets, good wine, and even better food. We even progressed to Friday afternoon “wine-time” sessions and started once-a-month Friday night dinners, sans babies (something that still continues today, and that I have serious FOMO about now that I’m no longer in Australia). We did joint birthday parties. Christmas parties. Our families became each other’s families.

 

 

 

We’ve had joyful celebrations as a group, and devastating sadness too. But we’ve been there for each other at every twist and turn and I can honestly say that if it wasn’t for you, I’m not sure I’d have made it through. You’ve helped me realise that all the challenges – no matter how big, or small – are worth it.

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In the early days of motherhood, Clara was a difficult baby. She never slept. Like, never. Maybe for 20 minutes at a time, a couple of times a day. She’d feed, scream for three hours, then feed again, and the cycle continued. She was diagnosed with reflux at five months of age, something that was obviously contributing to her discomfort. She’d had a difficult birth, and I didn’t produce much breastmilk and so switched to my saviour, formula. I used to panic about meeting up with you and your ‘perfect’ babies. I used to walk the streets of Brighton in tears. Exhausted. Unhappy.

But then I’d bump into one of you women at the shops, and my day could be turned around in an instant. We’d talk, we’d vent, we’d cry. For us, there was always someone ready to listen, and someone ready not to judge.

We talked about sleeplessness, our careers, our changing identities, our partners, and our dreams. Time passed. More babies arrived. Some of us moved interstate or abroad. Some went back to work. Some didn’t. We kept our Facebook group alive. We met in person as often as we could. And our Friday night dinners continued.

And now, even though I’m here in the United States, I know in my heart that we’ll be friends for life.

I miss you so very much. Since I know you’ll likely be reading this at one point or another, what I want you to know is just how much our incredible group means to me, and just how much I feel its support and influence despite my being so many thousands of kilometres away.

You helped me realise just how important it is to be open to new experiences, and throw oneself into the unknown with hope and curiosity for what might come next.

And with that in mind, here I am. Waiting, patiently, to meet some new friends in the States.

clare x 1

 

 

 

8 thoughts on “[9] Love Letter

  1. Zoe says:

    I got you lady…we can do this shit…we can survive and have a laugh about all the crap this American Life is throwing at us at some point in the future….big hugs my friend xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Clare says:

      Yep, we totally got this! You are my new mother’s group of one but we’ll build an empire 😉 Lots of love – glad I have you to go through this with me! xx

      Like

  2. aussiesingerinberlin says:

    Look at our little no. 1’s so tiny and so unable to talk back! Missing sharing our parenting misadventures and our forays back into our own lives with you in person dear Lady.m, but loving these insights the inter webs are giving us into your new adventures. And of course we will be life long friends, we were in the trenches of first time parenthood together. Much love. K xo

    Like

  3. aussiesingerinberlin says:

    Look at our little no. 1’s so tiny and so unable to talk back! Missing sharing our parenting misadventures and our forays back into our own lives with you in person dear Lady, but loving these insights the inter webs are giving us into your new adventures. And of course we will be life long friends, we were in the trenches of first time parenthood together. Much love. K xo

    Liked by 1 person

    • Clare says:

      Awwwww, Katrina, your comment just made me well up. I’m feeling all emotional! We will definitely be friends for good. I very much miss the in-person chats and venting and support! Lots of love xxx

      Like

  4. Julie Bates says:

    Clare, such a beautiful and authentic read! Just to remind you, it was you that was at the head of keeping us all together and making sure that we stayed connected!
    I remember meeting you for the first time and instantly feeling your warmth. As much as you felt nervous and didn’t think you needed any more friends, you are a natural at bringing a group together.
    Thank you for being so wonderful!!
    Lots of 💕 Jules X

    Like

    • Clare says:

      Jules! Now I really am crying. Thank you. That’s so kind of you and lovely of you to say. I feel like we were all warm and came together naturally. We are all ace. Miss you heaps xx

      Like

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